Next stop: Oslo Airport, the Worlds greenest terminal

Oslo-based practice Nordic-Office of Architecture signs a 115,000 sqm expansion to Oslo Airport and has achieved the world’s first BREEAM “Excellent” sustainability rating for an airport building. The competition-winning...
Oslo Airport - Photo Dag Spant
Oslo Airport - Photo Dag Spant

Oslo-based practice Nordic-Office of Architecture signs a 115,000 sqm expansion to Oslo Airport and has achieved the world’s first BREEAM “Excellent” sustainability rating for an airport building. The competition-winning design, which uses snow as a coolant, doubles the size of the existing terminal building with the addition of a new, 300m long pier.

Langsnitterten.3dm

Nordic- Oslo Airport “Oslo Airport is now more spacious, more efficient and more comfortable for the passengers. The expansion project was delivered on time and under budget by the design team.” –  Dag-Falk Petersen, CEO of AVINOR

 

Nordic, an architecture practice headquartered in Oslo with offices in London and Copenhagen continued the timeless architectural expression and rational simplicity of the original airport. Counting on two completed major projects in 2017: Gardermoen, Terminal 2 extension to Oslo Airport and Bergen airport, the practice’s landmark Istanbul New Airport, due to open in 2018, will be the largest airport in the world.

Accessibility

Nordic’s design increases the airport capacity from 19million to an anticipated future capacity of 30million, whilst passenger flow was improved with a maximum walking distance of just 450m, far shorter than most airports. The practice also updated the existing train station, which sits at the heart of the airport enabling 70% of all passengers to access the airport by public transport.

Plan-D-2.3dm

Strategy

Snow from the runways will be collected and stored during wintertime in an on site depot to be used as coolant during the summer. Natural materials have been used throughout the building: the new pier is entirely clad in timber sourced from Scandinavian forests. Recycled steel and special, environmentally friendly, concrete mixed with volcanic ash has been used throughout. By choosing environmentally friendly materials, the building’s CO2 emissions were reduced by 35%. Enhanced levels of insulation mean the project has achieved Passive House level performance standards. Energy consumption in the new expansion has been cut by more than 50% compared to the existing terminal.

Comfort

Passenger comfort and well-being have been key drivers of the design throughout. Artificial lighting is designed only as a minimal supplement to high levels of natural daylight, and can be set to reflect different moods according to weather, season and time of day.  A panoramic window at the north end of the pier, a 300-metre long skylight and curved glazed windows on both sides open up the view to the surrounding landscape and beyond.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Sarah Barlondo is the Founder and Editor in Chief at Mood Board Magazine. An entrepreneur and devoted activist, she studied Architecture at Parsons, School of Design and Journalism+Politics at The New School in New York. She founded Access New in New York, the first student coalition for students with disabilities. Sarah Barlondo is now based in London where she studied at the Architectural Association, School of Architecture and is now completing her Architecture degree at Central Saint Martins.